10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in April

Check out these great books coming in April. Place your holds now!

Maya’s Notebook
by Isabel Allende 
In Allende’s latest, 19-year-old Berkeley native Maya moves to the Chilean island of Chiloé, sent by her grandmother to escape a recent descent into drugs and crime. Although Allende sets this novel in the present day, she manages to weave Chile’s dark political history into the story. Booklist raves, Maya’s Notebook “is a boldly plotted, sharply funny, and purposefully bone-shaking novel of sexual violence, political terror, "collective shame," and dark family secrets, all transcended by courage and love.”

Life After Life
by Kate Atkinson
Popular mystery writer Atkinson takes a break from her Jackson Brodie series for a historical and speculative novel with an unusual premise that Booklist calls “wildly inventive.” Life After Life follows Ursula Todd from her birth in 1910 England through World War II as she relives her life in numerous ways, experiencing death and rebirth multiple times, while world history is rewritten over and over. Atkinson plays with the idea that life could take any direction in a novel that is “provocative, entertaining and beautifully written” (Kirkus Reviews).

Life After Life
by Jill McCorkle
Coincidentally, author Jill McCorkle has a new novel with the exact same name that is also receiving early praise. Her Life After Life follows the people who cross paths at a retirement center in small-town North Carolina. Kirkus says “McCorkle's masterful microcosm invokes profound sadness, harsh insight and guffaws, often on the same page.”

Last Friends
by Gardam, Jane 
Last Friends concludes the trilogy British author Gardam began with Old Filth (2006) and The Man in the Wooden Hat (2011), known for its “witty style, insatiable readability, and cast of strange and amazing characters” (Booklist). While the two earlier books concentrated on Sir Edward "Old Filth" Feathers and his wife, Betty, this new volume turns to Sir Edward’s longtime rival, Sir Terence Veneering, and his rise from poverty in an era when class meant everything. In a starred review, Kirkus calls it “exquisitely expressive” and “impeccably written.”

Harvard Square 
by Andre Aciman
Harvard Square takes place in 1970’s Boston, where an Egyptian Jewish Harvard student befriends a Tunisian Muslim cab driver. United by a common language (French) and shared immigrant experiences, they spend the summer chasing women until circumstances create a wedge between them. Publishers Weekly gives Harvard Square a starred review, and Booklist says it “provides an interesting look at the dilemmas of identity, the concept of home, and our enduring need to belong.” Egyptian-born Aciman is the author of an acclaimed memoir and several novels, including Call Me By Your Name (2007), a New York Times Notable Book and Lambda Literary Award winner.

The Hope Factory
by Lavanya Sankaran
The Hope Factory is “a vivid exposé of modern India's growing pains” (Kirkus), in which the owner of an auto parts manufacturer tries to expand his business without the help of his father-in-law. Meanwhile, his family’s household help are struggling, like the maid who is trying to provide for her family while fighting eviction from a rental that has been targeted by developers. Publishers Weekly offers high praise to Sankaran, saying The Hope Factory “firmly establishes her talent through the nuances of her characters and a striking exploration of culture.”

Snapper
by Brian Kimberling
Nathan Lochmueller is an aimless college graduate whose talent for tracking birds lands him a job as a researcher despite his usual poor luck. As he wanders through the forests of southern Indiana, he encounters a number of curious folks. At home he struggles with his complicated romantic relationship and doomed capers with his immature friends. Kirkus calls Snapper “a well-turned debut that airdrops its characters into an appealingly offbeat milieu” told with a “wry, self-deprecating wit.”

The Morels
by Christopher Hacker
In this metafictional drama, Arthur Morel has just finished a loosely autobiographical novel called The Morels, in which he has described a shocking and criminal family secret. He claims it is fiction, but his family no longer believes him, causing an avalanche of personal and legal troubles. Morel runs into the novel’s narrator, a filmmaker, who decides to make a documentary that will separate the family’s truth from fiction. Library Journal calls it “entertaining,” “audacious,” “thought-provoking” and “one of the top first novels of the year.”

The Carrion Birds
by Urban Waite
The hero of this dark thriller is a widower, father of a son with a disability, Vietnam veteran, and a drug smuggler. He’s ready to retire from the cartel and start a new life with his son, but he has one last score to settle. Kirkus Reviews calls The Carrion Birds “fierce and lyrical”, saying “Waite's narrative rages as a perfect torrent of violence flooding toward its inevitable conclusion.” Library Journal recommends it for fans of Cormac McCarthy and “readers who like their crime fiction on the dark side.”

The Humanity Project
by Jean Thompson
The Humanity Project is a compassionate look at people struggling with bad circumstances and bad choices. Sean is a handyman, low on work and about to lose his house, while his teenage son, Conner, makes a series of disastrous decisions. Art is a pot-smoking divorcee who is suddenly a father again when his estranged 15-year-old daughter is sent to live with him after a tragedy and a string of dangerous behavior. The lives of these characters intersect when a wealthy widow decides to establish a nonprofit with a vague mission: The Humanity Project. Booklist calls The Humanity Project “instantly addictive,” saying “Thompson is at her tender and scathing best in this tale of yearning, paradox, and hope.” Thompson’s books have earned high praise; her novel The Year We Left Home was selected by Kirkus as one of the best books of the year in 2011, her 2009 story collection Do Not Deny Me was a New York Times Notable Book, and Who Do You Love: Stories was a 1999 National Book Award finalist for fiction.

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