10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in May

Here's a preview of 10 great novels coming this month.

And the Mountains Echoed book coverAmericanah book coverA Constellation of Vital Phenomena book coverDead Ever After book coverA Delicate Truth book coverMontaro Caine book coverLittle Green book coverGood Kings Bad Kings book coverNorwegian by Night book coverKing of Cuba book cover

And the Mountains Echoed
by Khaled Hosseini
Readers around the world who loved The Kite Runner and A Thousand Splendid Suns will be thrilled to get their hands on the newest book by best-selling novelist Khaled Hosseini. And the Mountains Echoed traces the intertwined stories of Afghanis in their home country and around the world in what Library Journal calls “a gorgeous tapestry of disparate characters joined by threads of blood and fate.” Booklist calls it a “vital, profound, and spellbinding saga.”

Americanah
by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Adichie is the author of critically acclaimed and award-winning novels Purple Hibiscus (2003) and Half of a Yellow Sun. Her newest novel tells the story of Ifemelu, a Nigerian woman who leaves her home country and her sweetheart to study in the United States, where she faces immense difficulties. When she starts blogging her rants about the racism she observes and experiences in the U.S., she wins admiration and financial rewards, all the while struggling with the separation from her love. Library Journal calls Americanah “witty, wry, and observant” saying “Adichie is a marvelous storyteller who writes passionately about the difficulty of assimilation and the love that binds a man, a woman, and their homeland.”

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena
by Anthony Marra
A Constellation of Vital Phenomena follows the lives of a child, a failed doctor and a surgeon struggling to survive in war-torn Chechnya. It received starred reviews from BooklistLibrary Journal and Publishers Weekly and is the number one book on the Indie Next List, a monthly list of recommendations from independent booksellers from across the country. Kirkus Reviews calls it a “somber, sensitive portrait of how lives fray and bind again in chaotic circumstances.” You can read or listen to a preview here.

Dead Ever After
by Charlaine Harris
Fans of the Sookie Stackhouse fantasy/mystery books (and their TV adaptation True Blood) take note: this is the final novel in Harris’ immensely popular series.

A Delicate Truth
by John Le Carré
Le Carré has been writing acclaimed espionage novels for almost five decades. His newest follows the cover-up of a counterterrorism effort gone wrong in Gibraltar. Reviewers have been noting the lack of moral ambiguity that characterized so many of his earlier works; Booklist describes this change as a “new, shockingly realistic kind of noir in which right-thinking individuals who challenge the institutional order of things always lose.”

Montaro Caine
by Sidney Poitier
Beloved Academy Award-winning actor Poitier is the author of this month’s most unexpected debut, a mystery and science fiction mash-up in which the CEO of a multinational mining corporation seeks the origin of a mysterious coin.  Kirkus Reviews calls Montaro Caine “a pleasant surprise, elegantly written and keenly observed.”

Little Green: An Easy Rawlins Mystery
by Walter Mosley
Fans of Easy Rawlins will be overjoyed to learn that he’s back. In Blonde Faith (2007), Easy’s life (and the series) appeared to come to an end when he drove off a cliff, but in Little Green he awakens from a coma, it is still 1967, and Easy gets back into the P.I. game. His mission is to find a missing young man last seen in a Sunset Strip Club, which immerses Easy in the unfamiliar world of L.A.’s hippie culture. Library Journal calls it a “taut tale that rises above other mysteries through its strong African American protagonist.”

Good Kings Bad Kings
by Susan Nussbaum
This year’s recipient of the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction, Good Kings Bad Kings takes us on a scathing and tender tour behind the scenes at the Illinois Learning and Life Skills Center, a nursing home for teenagers with disabilities. As Kirkus Reviews puts it, “Nussbaum's vivid portraits of a wide variety of ILLC residents, some of whom are mentally ill as well as physically challenged, reveal the three-dimensional humanity of people the rest of society is all too willing to neglect and ignore. Well-meaning, well-written and well-plotted, with qualified justice for some of the bad guys and hope for a few of the oppressed.” Debut novelist Nussbaum is a playwright and disability rights activist.

Norwegian by Night
by Derek B. Miller
Advanced age and the beginnings of dementia force Sheldon Horowitz to leave Manhattan and move in with his granddaughter and her husband in Oslo in a novel that Kirkus Reviews describes as “part memory novel, part police procedural, part sociopolitical tract and part existential meditation.” A hate crime prompts Horowitz to protect a young boy while he battles his fading sanity and grapples with his emotional wounds as a Korean War veteran and the loss of his son in Vietnam. Booklist asserts “no brief plot outline can do justice to a book that deserves to find a place on a few best-of-the-year lists” and compares Norwegian by Night to the works of popular Scandinavian authors Stieg Larsson, Henning Mankell, and Jo Nesbø.

King of Cuba
by Cristina García
In her latest novel, García imagines the life of Cuba’s aging dictator, interspersed with the rants of Goyo, an octogenarian Cuban exile in Miami who stews with hatred for the leader while he plots his assassination. Booklist calls King of Cuba “spectacularly agile, strategically surreal, wryly tender, and devilishly funny” and Publishers Weekly describes García’s writing as “laced with candor and wit as she portrays the lives of two men united by the past.” García is the author of six novels, including Dreaming in Cuban (1992) which was nominated for the National Book Award.

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