The Great War

"In Flanders fields the poppies blow between the crosses, row on row."

Sunday, November 11, marks the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, the War to End All War. The armistice that ended the fighting was signed at 11 a.m., Paris time, “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.” The Great War decimated a generation in England and on the continent. More than 100,000 Americans also died of injuries or illness after we joined the conflict in April of 1917.

Readers know that the Great War’s trauma produced a legacy of great books. Many fall in the category of well-known classics; others will be less familiar to American readers. We’ll look at a handful of them here.

One of the great histories of World War I is Barbara Tuchman’s 1962  The Guns of August. She begins her story with the funeral of Edward VII in 1910 and covers the full sweep of the war.

Two memoirs of the war are worth your

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Centennial Saturdays at Temescal Branch

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Frederick Roberts: California's First African American Legislator

In honor of election day the African American Museum and Library at Oakland profiles political figure Frederick Madison Roberts.

      

Today is Election Day in the United States of America. Your vote counts. On this Election Day, the African American Museum and Library at Oakland profiles political figure Frederick Madison Roberts. Roberts was born in Chillicothe, Ohio in 1880 to Andrew J. and Ellen Wales Roberts. From his mother, he acquired the distinction of being the great-grandson of Sally Hemings, a woman reputed to be the mistress of Thomas Jefferson.

There were two milestones in Roberts’ distinguished life. First, Roberts was the first African American to graduate from Los Angeles High School. He went on to attend the University of Southern California for one semester and then transferred to Colorado College, where he received an A.B. in legal studies. He also served in his first civic office, acting as deputy assessor of El Paso County, Colorado.

             

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10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in November 2018

Any room on your holds list? Here are some of the most tempting novels and story collections coming out this November.

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Books by Trans and Gender Variant Authors

Looking for poetry, fiction, and non-fiction reads by trans, non-binary, and gender non-conforming authors? Look no further!

Listed below are some new and not-so-new books written by trangender and gender variant authors available at Oakland Public Library. For a description of each book, just click on the title link.

 Fiction and Poetry

 All the Birds in the Sky            
Asegi Stories     

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International Games Week & Month @ OPL!

Are you a gamer? Did you know that International Games Week is November 4-10, 2018? Luckily, you can play all month long at OPL.

Image of black and white dice

International Games Week is November 4-10, 2018. Whether you're into video games or old-fashioned board games, we've got fun events for you, your friends, and your family all month long!

Thursday 11/1

Wii U Super Smash Bros. Preliminary Tournament @ Dimond Branch

Saturday 11/3

Super Smash Bros Preliminary Tournament

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Educator Resources for Native American History Month

Have you noticed Michael Wertz's ABC Oakland honors Natives with 'O is for Ohlone' ? Oakland was home to the Ohlone Tribe. As we approach November and Native American Indians come to the forefront, we invite you to explore the culture, connect with the community and grow your understanding of Native Americans.

Have you noticed Michael Wertz's ABC Oakland honors Natives with 'O is for Ohlone' ? Oakland is Ohlone land.  As we approach November and Native American Indians come to the forefront, we invite you to explore the culture, connect with the community and grow your understanding of Native Americans.  

Explore three oral histories shared by the California Museum.

Connect with educators at the Oakland Museum Teacher's Lounge 4-7pm Friday, November 2, where with the topic will be 

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New Books By Indigenous North American Writers

Exciting new fiction, poetry and nonfiction by indigenous authors.

November is Native American Heritage Month and OPL has new books by Indigenous U.S. authors to keep you reading throughout the month and year. Fiction, poetry, memoir, biography, and cookbooks are among the the new books we recently added to our collection.

Happy reading!

Fiction and Poetry

Where the Dead Sit Talking     Mapping the Interior     There There

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Halloween & Día de los Muertos @ OPL!

If you love spooky season and/or celebrate Día de los Muertos, we've got you covered with fun events for all ages!

Wednesday 10/31

Halloween Family StorytimeImage of spooky pumpkin

We're having a special (sorta-)spooky storytime! Gather 'round the campfire and get ready to giggle and shriek at tales of toddler-friendly terror. We will sing and dance and then do a pumpkin craft.

Recommended for ages 3-7, but all of your family is welcome.

Wednesday, October 31st, 10:30am @ Elmhurst Branch

 

 

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A Brief History of Oakland's Madison Square

Madison Square has been home to the Chinese community since the 1860s.

Madison Square, originally called Caroline Square, was one of seven public squares in the early days of Oakland. The residential district that grew up around it makes up the residential end of Tong Yan Fow--Chinatown--and has housed the Chinese community since its earliest days. By 1860, there were 200 Chinese residents out of a total population of 1500 in Oakland. 

In 1882 President Chester A. Arthur signed the Chinese Exclusion Act which prohibited Chinese workers from coming to America and denying citizenship to those Chinese nationals already living and working here. This act suppressed the Chinese population in America for decades; Oakland’s Chinatown was no exception. There was widespread housing and employment discrimination. Few white employers would hire Chinese except as houseboys or agricultural workers. Even the refugee camp along the shores of Lake Merritt after the Great Quake of ‘06 was racially segregated with

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