Your Library. Your Summer Reading. Your Book Reviews.

Here are some of the books YOU are reading this summer!

Are you participating in our Summer Reading Program yet?  Yes, I'm talking to you - you adult out there who thought summer reading was just for kids!  It's not, and there are prizes to be won!

Also, we want your book reviews...  if you post them on the website, they'll show up right here on the library's website.  Spread the word and help other library users find some new things to read.  Go straight on over to the book review form and let us know what we should (or shouldn't) read this summer.

Here are the reviews we've received so far...

From Christine:
I could not put the book down ounce I started reading it. It took about 9 Hours and I am a slow reader but it was great. It really make you think about it. Do you really want to be rich or famous?
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The Book is pretty good, a little slow at first then it starts getting a little juicy. Would I read it again possibly.
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This book was good keep me on my toes. It had a lot of twist and turns. 
At the end I wish she did not go back to her ex-husband because to it shows as a weakness to our young readers.
That it is o.k. to cheat when you take the other person back.
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From Darnell:
One of the finest pieces imaginative writings yet put forth in the country.
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...And from super reader Michael:
Nonfiction that reads like a novel. It is fascinating to learn about the earliest people to look at the world through microscopes, to see microscopic "animals", and to fight harmful bacteria.
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Mediocre. No faster-than-light travel, so it is almost hard science fiction--apart from the magic antimatter rocks used to fuel spacecraft. I skimmed the boring parts.
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Toronto-, winter-, 1890s-noir with a good, albeit dismal, atmosphere. A promising “first” novel; however, the ending was too abrupt and not well justified by the progress of the police detective’s evidence-gathering. It was interesting to see the differences between the novel and the Murdoch Mysteries TV series.
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A succinct, modern (2007) text full of thought-provoking concepts. Themes: 1. Most structures were mud brick & wood--destroyed by termites, rain, desiccation, & wind. Except Egypt and Zimbabwe. Even Mali: Timbuktu/ Jenne-Jeno are mud that is constantly maintained. 2. Ethiopia had about a 1,000-year kingdom, Christian from A.D. 400, only conquered/ occupied from 1936-41 by Italian fascists. 3. Nigeria is its most populous country. 4. Value of African trade for Europe was small, for example, less than 5% of Britain's overseas trade. Seven European powers were involved, mainly Britain, France, Portugal with newcomers Germany, Italy, King Leopold of Belgium as an investor. Spain was a bit player. Alleges that "No two European powers ever came to blows in Africa--...until WWI." (I would have like more information on Liberia.)
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Africa is not just Egypt and Nubia! A pleasure to read and very informative. Themes: Neolithic age & cultivation, stone tools & Iron-Age. First centuries B.C. & Medieval. Drystone masonry. Hilltop forts. Earthworks. Stepped hillsides for crops. Trade across Sahara & along east Africa. Influence from the north & east. Export of ivory, gold, iron, slaves.
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A fascinating account of travel 1,900 Years Ago, written A.D. 95-130+/- by a Greek or Greek Egyptian. Troglodyteland = Barbaria + other Barbaria = coast of Africa from Sinai to horn of Africa; Azania = from horn to Zanzibar; Rhapta is near or south of Zanzibar & it is as far as the Periplus goes in that direction. It goes as far east as east central India with mention or hints of the Ganges at the coast, Burma, and China. This translation included an epitome of sections of Agatharkhides of Knidos written about 113 B.C. in Alexandria describing the African coast of the Red Sea. The Sea is named after Eruthras, an ancient, wealthy Persian real estate developer & it has nothing to do with its color. (The notes will tell you that there was finally a complete water route from the Mediterranian Sea to the Nile to a canal to the Bitter Lakes to a canal cut to the Red Sea some time after A.D. 106; this canal operated for 600 or 700 years.)
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A fine novel to get warmed up for deeper reading of African history. I am so glad I read this. The author is brilliant in his incorporation of history and archaeology into the novel. The main character was "Dr." Sinuhe. Time frame: New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, before 1355 B.C. to about 1300 B.C.
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Worth reading if you are curious about Africa. Describes events about A.D. 1217-1237. Mali--under black "Muslim" (but makes sacrifices to jinn) high king & emperor Sundiata. In Mali the big harvest is Nov. and Dec.; young men travel after that, then return before the big rains in May and June. Before the rains come, Sundiata defeats Soumaoro at Krina and razes his capital city at Sosso. [Before the Mali empire: Ghana (Wagadou) then Sosso were dominant.]
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The Discovery of the Tomb of Tutankhamen by Howard Carter
A nice walk through of what was done in the greatest archaeological find of last century. I plan to read the next two volumes (of 1927 & 1933) as well. The tomb entrance was discovered Nov. 4, 1922. By mid-Feb. the Antechamber was cleared and the door to the Sepulchral Hall was penetrated. (Vols. 2 & 3 address the clearing of the Annexe, S.H., and store chamber.)
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This book turned me into a Mars nut, gave me a new hobby by kindling an enthusiasm for exploration of the solar system, and led me to an interest in observational astronomy, cosmology, and extra-solar planets. I recommend this book for engineers and other practical dreamers and for fellow science fiction aficionados who lean toward what might be possible versus fantasy.
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An outstanding collection for engineers and builders. It took me a while to get into the right mindset for it, but when I did I enjoyed it. There are six-page descriptions about 20 buildings, seven bridges, and ten miscellaneous wood structures.
Included are the Golden Gate Park Conservatory of Flowers, Old Faithful Inn, the Tacoma Dome, and blimp hangars from WWII. There are covered bridges and a freeway bridge. The misc. structures include the USS Constitution, the Mosquito Bomber, a timber pile foundation, wood foundations on permafrost, a timber bulkhead, a roller coaster, the US Air Force's EMP test TRESTLE, and the Santa Cruz Municipal Pier.
This book made more aware of the versatility, durability, and strength of wood.
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*Hard Science Fiction* spanning millennia of stark changes to Earth. Excellent and so delightful that, as I read it, I thought it might be the best science fiction novel I've read. I'll read more of Jack Williamson if I can find anything as good as this.
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That's all for the adult program, but ya know - little ones can enter book reviews too!  Here's one of the cutest ones we've gotten through our children's Summer Reading Challenge:
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Timmy Failure: Mistakes were made by Stephen Pastis
Well, when you get the first feel of how the book speaks to you, when you get to read it, it really gives you the good feeling of what a dectective life is like. And so like, when you read the book, if you're thinking of being a dectective, it is a really funny book, and it can get you educated in a way. And since we all have great parents, we know that they can help us read the book if we can't read it alone. I really liked the book. It's one of my favorite books. And the reason I like to read it is because it gives you a sense of how good a book can be, how good an author can be, and it's really good.  

Don't forget to leave your own review!

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