Poetry Month at Oakland Libraries

And it was at that age ... Poetry arrived in search of me -Pablo Neruda

Join us at libraries all over Oakland as we celebrate "language at its most distilled and most powerful" (Rita Dove), "eternal graffiti written in the heart of everyone" (Lawrence Ferlinghetti) and "making the private world public" (Allen Ginsberg).

April is ... poetry month. 

Events for Adults

Blackout Poetry
Repurpose the pages of old books & magazines into poetic works of art! Intended for adults but welcomes teens and kids ages 8+. Supplies provided.
▸Golden Gate Branch, April 3, 6pm

Bi-Ku: Bike Haiku and More with the Women Bike Book Club
Read and discuss bike related poetry. Everyone is welcome to attend and participate in discussing bikes and feminism in a WTF friendly (but not exclusive) space.
▸Golden Gate Branch, April 5, 6 pm

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OPL Responds: Mass Shootings, Community Violence, and School Safety

We’ve compiled a list of resources that will cover grief/fear/trauma, speaking to your children about traumatic events, gun laws, advocacy, and safety info. We hope you find this helpful.

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After last month’s tragic shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL, student activists brought the gun debate to a national level by pressuring lawmakers to make changes.

There are many different aspects attached to the mass community violence that have been dominating the national and local news for decades. What do you need to know? We’ve compiled a list of resources that will cover grief/fear/trauma, speaking to your children about traumatic events, gun laws, advocacy, and safety info. We hope you find this helpful.

   

Parents & Caregivers: Talking to Children about Traumatic Events

When getting ready to speak to your children about these issues, it is important to remember that everybody processes grief and traumatic events differently. Here are some resources that provide helpful tips on this delicate subject:

  • NPR, with help from the

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AAMLO Celebrates Women's History Month

The African American Museum & Library at Oakland is proud to announce its speakers series, "Extraordinary Women, Extraordinary Times" in honor of this year's Women's History Month. Please join us each Saturday in March at 2:00 p.m. for an discussion with an engaging series of speakers.

Lise Pearlman, Saturday March 3

Considered the country’s leading expert on the 1968 Huey Newton death penalty trail in Oakland, Ms. Pearlman studied law at Boalt Hall, UC Berkeley, and practiced law in Alameda County. She appeared in the acclaimed 2015 documentary, “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” and she will be signing copies of her new book, With Justice For Some: Politically Charged Criminal Trials in the Early 20th Century That Helped Shape Today’s America.

Careth Reid, Saturday March 10 

Ms. Reid is a native of Berkeley and a lifelong educator and champion of community service in the Bay Area. She is a recipient of the San Francisco State University “Alumna of the Year” award and an inductee in the university’s Hall of Fame. She will be signing copies of her book, The Picture Man: From the Collection of Bay Area Photographer E.F. Joseph, 1927 – 1979 which she wrote with co-author, dance legend, and Oakland native, choreographer, Ruth Beckford.

Halifu Osumare, Saturday March 17

A participant and

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We've Accomplished so Much!

What has OPL accomplished in the last six months?

Here at the library, we are engaged in a strategic planning process and through that process, we have developed a new mission statement, a vision statement, core values, and three-year goals.  

You've probably seen "explore, connect, and grow" on some of our materials recently, including our last annual report and all of our summer program materials.  This year our (coming soon) annual report will be focused on YOU and Your Oakland Public Library.  That's because our mission is, "Your Oakland Public Library empowers all people to explore, connect, and grow," and we take it quite seriously.

Hopefully our core values aren't a surprise to you, as we aspire to infuse them into everything we do.

And what about those three year goals?  Well, in no particular

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OPL Responds: I.C.E. in the Bay Area

Here's what you need to know to protect yourself or support friends and neighbors in the event of an I.C.E. raid in the Bay Area.

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Recent reports that I.C.E. (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) descended on businesses in the Bay Area remind us how important it is to know your rights.  

The library can help you get the information you need to protect yourself, your family, and your neighbors. Ask us! If we don’t know the answer, we’ll connect you to someone who does.

Creative Commons photo by Joe

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African Americans in Times of War: The Story of We Also Serve

In honor of this year’s Black History Month theme, “African Americans in Times of War,” the African American Museum & Library at Oakland will feature events and community blog posts in February that tell the stories African Africans’ valiant and brave contributions to our country both at home and abroad in war time.

World War II brought profound changes to the African American community in Oakland and across the Bay Area. In the first four years of the war, the African American population of Oakland bloomed from 8,462 in 1940 to 21, 770 by 1944 to a considerable 47,562 residents by 1950.  Some families were beckoned to the Bay Area by government recruiters that scoured the South and Midwest looking for workers to fill the manpower shortage in war industries caused by the war. But most families moved here based on word of mouth from family members and Pullman Porters who touted the area’s plentiful jobs, good wages, and better opportunities for families seeking to escape the brutal social conditions of the American South. Most African Americans migrants came from four states – Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma – and some referred to the trains out West as ‘Liberty trains.’ Economic opportunities for African Americans expanded exponentially following Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 8802 prohibiting racial discrimination in hiring in federal war industries. Roosevelt was

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African Americans in Times of War

Black History Month 2018 focuses on African Americans in Times of War. Join us for events every Saturday in February as we honor veterans of various wars.

                                                                                

This years’ Black History Month theme is African Americans in Times of War.  The African American Museum and Library at Oakland [AAMLO] is commemorating this every Saturday in the month of February with programs honoring our veterans.

Saturday February 3 “Black Warriors, The Buffalo Soldiers of World War II”

Saturday February 10 “Finding Our Place: The Oakland Black Veteran Experience”

Saturday February 17 “Col. Charles Young and the Buffalo Soldiers at the Presidio”

Saturday February 24 “Why We Fight”

African Americans have served our country with pride for centuries in the United States military.

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E.J. (Evangeline) Montgomery: Oakland African American artists' advocate

The African American Museum & Library at Oakland celebrates an arts champion.

Portrait of Evangeline J. Montgomery (1973)Oakland Post Photograph Collection, MS 169, African American Museum and Library at Oakland, Oakland Public Library. Oakland, California.

E.J. (Evangeline) Montgomery, who had been active in the Los Angeles art networks in the 1950s and 1960s, moved to Oakland in 1965 and by 1967 had founded an African American artists' advocacy group called Art West Associated North (AWAN). Like other political organizations concerned with African American visibility and self-definition, the association protested the exclusion of African American artists from local museums and galleries. In a note published in the exhibition catalog "

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Calling All Immigrant Artists!

Apply Now! The Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program: Oakland offers immigrant artists the opportunity to focus on their creative practice, gain support and exposure for their work, while upholding their distinct cultural identities.

Photo of artistsThe Oakland Public Library is excited to be a partner in an exciting new program being brought to our city by the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA).  The Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program: Oakland offers immigrant artists the opportunity to focus on their creative practice, gain support and exposure for their work, while upholding their distinct cultural identities.

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NYFA has developed a method that has proved successful in

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Welcome to the new AAMLO!

AAMLO's new Interim Chief Curator, Susan Anderson, greets the community.

Portrait of boy and girl, Oliver Denny photographer, Sacramento,1867 Royal E. Towns papers 

I started my tenure as Interim Chief Curator at the African American Museum and Library on October 21. It’s been an eventful and productive couple of months. The African American Museum and Library at Oakland is re-dedicating itself to its mission – to preserve and make accessible the history of African Americans in the Bay Area and California. We want people to know that our doors are open. Our research collections are available for researchers of all types from high school students and local residents to worldwide academic scholars. Our museum space invites collaborative exhibits and stimulating programs. The wonderful staff here is knowledgeable and skilled at assisting researchers and partnering with the community. During the hours we’re open, when

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