Great Books and more

Comic-Con is on!

The 44th annual Comic-Con International is underway in San Diego.  The winners for the Will Eisner awards, considered the Oscars of the comics industry, will be announced today.  Nominees for titles published in 2012 are truly exceptional.

Titles with the most nominations are:

Building StoriesBuilding stories by Chris Ware with nominations for Best Graphic Album–New, Best Writer/artist, Best Coloring, Best Lettering, and Best Publication Design.

This work, made of many small books, posters and cards, and encased in a box the size of a large board game, tells the story of the residents of an apartment building in Chicago.  At times sad and at others forward-looking we peer into the lives of a single and lonely young woman, a couple, on the verge of a break-up and other inhabitants.  This work has also been honored with spots on the top ten lists of the New York Times Book Review, Time Magazine, and was named Publishers Weekly’s Best Book of the Year.

FataleFatale by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips, nominated for Best Continuing Series, Best New Series, Best Writer, Best Penciller/Inker, and Best Cover Artist.

Fatale is the story of a mysterious and beautiful woman who has been in hiding for 80 years.  She seems ageless, perhaps immortal.  In the present day, a reporter, Nicolas Lash, is pursuing her.  In a parallel story line, a reporter in San Francisco is pursuing this same woman in the 1950s.

HawkeyeHawkeye by Matt Fraction and David Aja, also nominated for Best Continuing Series, Best New Series, Best Writer, Best Penciller/Inker, and Best Cover Artist.

In this on-going tale, Clint Barton, or Hawkeye as he’s known as part of the Avengers team, fights the dirtiest criminals in New York City along with his sidekick, Kate Bishop.

Find the full list of nominees (and winners, tonight) in all categories here

What are some of your favorite comics and graphic novels?  Geek out in the comments.

Posted on: July 19, 2013, by Jenera Burton, Piedmont Ave branch

 

 

Mysteries of the Unknown

Come explore real-life ghost stories and other paranormal mysteries at the library…if you dare! They’re shelved together at the very start of the non-fiction section – look for the 001s and 133s or ask a staff member to point the way.

Ghosts book coverAre you afraid yet? book coverHaunted Histories book coverBeastly Tales book coverMystery of the bermuda triangle book coverAre you psychic? book coverMystery of UFOs book coverEncyclopedia Horrifica

Ghosts: a nonfiction companion to A good night for ghosts / by Mary Pope Osborne and Natalie Pope Boyce; illustrated by Sal Murdocca

Are you afraid yet?: the science behind scary stuff / written by Stephen James O'Meara; illustrated by Jeremy Kaposy

Haunted histories: creepy castles, dark dungeons, and powerful palaces / J. H. Everett and Marilyn Scott-Waters

Beastly tales: Yeti, Bigfoot, and the Loch Ness Monster / written by Malcolm Yorke

The mystery of the Bermuda Triangle / Chris Oxlade

Are you psychic?: the official guide for kids / Helaine Becker; Claudia Dávila, illustrator

The mystery of UFOs / by Judith Herbst; illustrated by Greg Clarke

Encyclopedia horrifica: the terrifying truth! about vampires, ghosts, monsters, and more / Joshua Gee

Mysteries of the Unknown

Come explore real-life ghost stories and other paranormal mysteries at the library…if you dare! They’re shelved together at the very start of the non-fiction section – look for the 001s and 133s or ask a staff member to point the way.

Ghosts book cover  Are you afraid yet? book cover  Haunted Histories book cover  Beastly Tales book cover  

Mystery of the bermuda triangle book cover  Are you psychic? book cover  Mystery of UFOs book cover  Encyclopedia Horrifica

Ghosts: a nonfiction companion to A good night for ghosts / by Mary Pope Osborne and Natalie Pope Boyce; illustrated by Sal Murdocca

Are you afraid yet?: the science behind scary stuff / written by Stephen James O'Meara; illustrated by Jeremy Kaposy

Haunted histories: creepy castles, dark dungeons, and powerful palaces / J. H. Everett and Marilyn Scott-Waters

Beastly tales: Yeti, Bigfoot, and the Loch Ness Monster / written by Malcolm Yorke

The mystery of the Bermuda Triangle / Chris Oxlade

Are you psychic?: the official guide for kids / Helaine Becker; Claudia Dávila, illustrator

The mystery of UFOs / by Judith Herbst; illustrated by Greg Clarke

Encyclopedia horrifica: the terrifying truth! about vampires, ghosts, monsters, and more / Joshua Gee

The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford

The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford is considered one of the best 100 best novels of all time. One reviewer called it the "finest French novel in the English language." This alludes to the complex plot, fascinating involvements and constant surprises. It recreates the difficult relations between two "perfect" Victorian couples who leisurely travel and stay at the finest European luxury gathering places.
 
While "weeding" our collection, I came across this title. I was unfamiliar with it, but the preface sounded fascinating. I thought I'd give it a try that weekend while I went up the coast to bask in the beauty of the ocean crashing on the cliffs. My weekend went totally differently than I had planned. I holed up in a bed and breakfast and read nonstop. I could not put this book down. Sometimes a classic is a classic for a reason! The story is timeless in many ways, but definitely of-and-in the Victorian upper class world.
 
Don't be misled by the title. It is not about war. This book was to be published right at the end of WWI and the publisher didn't want Ford's title, The Saddest Story Ever Told, because everyone was dealing with sadness of The Great War To End All Wars. The main character had been soldier, liked and respected by all, hence a "Good Soldier." The publisher thought the public would be more willing to pick up a book featuring such an attractive person. This was a wildly popular book when it first came out and is considered Ford's best work.
 
Ford was a fascinating character and friend of many major writers of the era, including Joseph Conrad. After you read this title you'll want more from Ford and his friends.
 
I recommended this as a title for our book club at Lakeview. Below is the update to our group after the meeting:
 
The seven of us who were there really liked the book. A couple mentioned that at times it was confusing, because the narrator would jump forward and back in time. This was something the author did intentionally and we agreed that it helped build the suspense and sense of danger around this gathering of mostly unlikable people with mostly useless lives, deceiving and mistreating and emotionally torturing each other. There was something for everyone :>
 
We briefly wondered at the hormone level of the husband who never consummated his marriage. We agreed we actually knew people like this and didn't really understand it. We could see why this book has stayed popular.
 
One member mentioned that Ford's other most popular novel, Parade's End, is now in serial form on HBO.  BBC did a mini-series of the Good Soldier, (I believe only two episodes) and it is available at Main. I watched it eagerly and found it very good, but by no means as stunning as the novel.
Oakland Public Library currently has three copies of this novel. If those copies are checked out, be sure to reserve a copy from our Link+ system. Link+ allows us to borrow books that Oakland Public Library may not have available. You just need your card number and pin number to place a hold. There are many, many copies available through Link+. Call Main or any Branch if you need help placing a Link+ hold. ,,,or call me. 510-238-7344 at Lakeview :>
 
Mary Farrell, Branch Manager, Lakeview
 

75 years of the Caldecott Medal

Caldecott Anniversary LogoThe Caldecott Medal turned 75 this year, and the Association for Library Service to Children (a division of the American Library Association) celebrated last week at the ALA national conference in Chicago, where the 2013 Caldecott Medal was presented to Jon Klassen for This is Not My Hat.

You can celebrate at home or at your library!  Free resources at the Caldecott 75th Anniversary webpage include downloadable bookmarks with clues and answers about the special anniversary logo created by Brian Selznick, and pictured here.  Can you identify the 10 Caldecott honored titles pictured in the logo?  (The answers are here.)

Also be sure to check out  TeachingBooks.net  for multimedia resources about your favorite Caldecott winning books, including interviews and videos with the illustrators.   Do you want to know how to pronounce "Chris Raschka"?  Or "Jon Scieszka"? They will tell you.  See how Bryan Collier creates his collage illustrations, or browse a collection of video and audio interviews with Maurice Sendak.  

Which is your favorite Caldecott winning book 

The Caldecott Award is administered by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The 75th Anniversary illustration and logo copyright © 2012 by Brian Selznick. Used with permission of ALSC/ALA

75 years of the Caldecott Medal

Caldecott Anniversary LogoThe Caldecott Medal turned 75 this year, and the Association for Library Service to Children (a division of the American Library Association) celebrated last week at the ALA national conference in Chicago, where the 2013 Caldecott Medal was presented to Jon Klassen for This is Not My Hat.

You can celebrate at home or at your library!  Free resources at the Caldecott 75th Anniversary webpage include downloadable bookmarks with clues and answers about the special anniversary logo created by Brian Selznick, and pictured here.  Can you identify the 10 Caldecott honored titles pictured in the logo?  (The answers are here.)

Also be sure to check out  TeachingBooks.net  for multimedia resources about your favorite Caldecott winning books, including interviews and videos with the illustrators.   Do you want to know how to pronounce "Chris Raschka"?  Or "Jon Scieszka"? They will tell you.  See how Bryan Collier creates his collage illustrations, or browse a collection of video and audio interviews with Maurice Sendak.  

Which is your favorite Caldecott winning book?  

The Caldecott Award is administered by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The 75th Anniversary illustration and logo copyright © 2012 by Brian Selznick. Used with permission of ALSC/ALA

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Oh Say Can You Sing?

Want to discover a library secret? Go ahead and take a trip to the 782 section of the children’s nonfiction shelves and you’ll discover something amazing. Hidden treasures! Picture books that are meant to be SUNG! Some are traditional, others are silly – but all are crowdpleasing. Here are a few recommendations to warm up your singing voice:

Baby Beluga book cover  Down by the station book cover  Hush little baby book cover  I ain't gonna paint no more book cover

I love you! A Bushel and a Peck book cover  Let's Play in the Forest book cover  Let's sing a lullaby with the brave cowboy book cover   I love my white shoes book cover  Seals on the Bus book cover

Baby Beluga / Raffi; illustrations by Ashley Wolff

Down by the Station Jennifer Riggs Vetter; illustrations by Frank Remkiewicz

Hush, Little Baby / adapted and illustrated by Brian Pinkney

I Ain't Gonna Paint No More! / Karen Beaumont; illustrated by David Catrow

I Love You! A Bushel & a Peck / Frank Loesser; pictures by Rosemary Wells

Let's Play in the Forest While the Wolf is not Around / Claudia Rueda

Let's Sing a Lullaby with the Brave Cowboy / Jan Thomas

Pete the Cat: I Love my White Shoes / Eric Litwin; art by James Dean

The Seals on the Bus / Lenny Hort; illustrated by G. Brian Karas

Oh Say Can You Sing?

Want to discover a library secret? Go ahead and take a trip to the 782 section of the children’s nonfiction shelves and you’ll discover something amazing. Hidden treasures! Picture books that are meant to be SUNG! Some are traditional, others are silly – but all are crowdpleasing. Here are a few recommendations to warm up your singing voice:

Baby Beluga book coverDown by the station book coverHush little baby book coverI ain't gonna paint no more book coverI love you! A Bushel and a Peck book coverLet's Play in the Forest book coverLet's sing a lullaby with the brave cowboy book cover I love my white shoes book coverSeals on the Bus book cover

Baby Beluga / Raffi; illustrations by Ashley Wolff

Down by the Station / Jennifer Riggs Vetter; illustrations by Frank Remkiewicz

Hush, Little Baby / adapted and illustrated by Brian Pinkney

I Ain't Gonna Paint No More! / Karen Beaumont; illustrated by David Catrow

I Love You! A Bushel & a Peck / Frank Loesser; pictures by Rosemary Wells

Let's Play in the Forest While the Wolf is not Around / Claudia Rueda

Let's Sing a Lullaby with the Brave Cowboy / Jan Thomas

Pete the Cat: I Love my White Shoes / Eric Litwin; art by James Dean

The Seals on the Bus / Lenny Hort; illustrated by G. Brian Karas

Awesome Early Readers

It’s not always easy finding the right books to place in the hands of brand new readers. Letting kiddos choose their own books is a surefire strategy for creating excitement about reading – you can use the five finger rule to decide if a book is too hard for a child. If you want some tried and true favorites, take a look at the Geisel Award winners and mosey on over to your library to find these awesome early readers!:

I spy Fly Guy book cover  Rabbit and Robot book cover  Are you my mother book cover  Penny and her Song book cover  

Zelda and Ivy Keeping Secrets book cover  Ling and Ting book cover  Frog and Toad are friends book cover  There is a bird on your head! book cover

I spy Fly Guy! / Tedd Arnold

Rabbit & Robot: the sleepover / Cece Bell

Are you my mother/ P. D. Eastman

Penny and her song / Kevin Henkes

Zelda and Ivy: keeping secrets / Laura McGee Kvasnosky

Ling & Ting: not exactly the same/ Grace Lin

Frog and Toad are friends / Arnold Lobel

There is a bird on your head! / Mo Willems

Awesome Early Readers

It’s not always easy finding the right books to place in the hands of brand new readers. Letting kiddos choose their own books is a surefire strategy for creating excitement about reading – you can use the five finger rule to decide if a book is too hard for a child. If you want some tried and true favorites, take a look at the Geisel Award winners and mosey on over to your library to find these awesome early readers!:

I spy Fly Guy book coverRabbit and Robot book coverAre you my mother book coverPenny and her Song book coverZelda and Ivy Keeping Secrets book coverLing and Ting book coverFrog and Toad are friends book coverThere is a bird on your head! book cover

I spy Fly Guy! / Tedd Arnold

Rabbit & Robot: the sleepover / Cece Bell

Are you my mother? / P. D. Eastman

Penny and her song / Kevin Henkes

Zelda and Ivy: keeping secrets / Laura McGee Kvasnosky

Ling & Ting: not exactly the same! / Grace Lin

Frog and Toad are friends / Arnold Lobel

There is a bird on your head! / Mo Willems