New Years Resolutions Made To Be Broken

Have to abandoned your New Years' resolution yet?  If not, what are you waiting for? Cause New Year's Resolutions are made to be broken!  I'm sure someone is reading this thinking:

Quality GIFs Here

But hear me out. Or at least read to the end of this blog.  In my not-so-humble opinion,  New Year's resolutions are based on negative self-images.  Many of us say, " I need to change ___ about myself, and the new year is the time to do it."   I argue that when we create a resolution to change the things about ourselves that we do not like, we are focusing on the wrong things.  This negativity creates feelings of anxiety and depression, decreases self-worth,  and deserves to be abandoned long before February. 

I'm sure everyone has seen a meme or a gif with the phrase "New Year, New Me" and many more mocking the phrase.  Those who mock the phrase simply ask, "what was  wrong with the old you?"  Because, believe it or not, someone out there completely adores the old you, and we don't want you to resolve to change a thing. You deserve to be loved in all of your imperfections because an imperfect person is also a loveable person with a lovable mind and a loveable spirit.  

Those of us who love you want you to brace your authentic, divinely created self.   Does this mean I am telling everyone to stop improving and growing? Of course not!  We are all carbon-based Earth-bound life forms, and there is always room for improvement. Embracings self-improvement is one thing, but negative self-talk is quite another.  So abandon those negative self-talking New Years' resolutions.  You don't need them. Like Mary Poppins, you are most definitely  Practically Perfect In Every Way | Reaction Images | Know Your Meme

For titles about self-acceptance and the beauty of imperfection, check out the following:

 
 
 
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